Comments for http://blog.intheswim.com Blog for swimming pool owners, Care & Repair, Buyer's Guides and Pool Fun information Fri, 23 Feb 2018 21:19:47 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.3 Comment on Hard Pool Water: Removing Calcium Scale by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/hard-pool-water-removing-calcium-scale/comment-page-1/#comment-5916 Fri, 23 Feb 2018 21:19:47 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=16678#comment-5916 Hi Richard, there is no easy way, no chemical or process that will reliably remove calcium from the water, with exception to high efficiency filtration or water softening systems. I wish we had an easy ‘calcium reducer’ chemical – a few have come and gone over the years, but nothing has really worked – the solution is dilution. However, you can control calcium scale and cloudy water if you use a Stain & Scale chemical like Stain Away or Scale Free, to keep minerals locked in solution, where they can’t come out, to cloud the water. Doesn’t lower the calcium level, just keeps the mineral dissolved. When calcium is high, and it comes out of solution, a nice big filter can trap a lot of calcium. Sand filters can use a cup of Aluminum Sulfate to improve filtration. You can use pool clarifiers (but don’t overdose) to assist a small filter, during a clouding event. Cloudy water can come from calcium, but can also be an indication of poor filtration, not enough filtration, or low chlorine levels, all of which can make the water cloudy.

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Comment on Hard Pool Water: Removing Calcium Scale by Richard http://blog.intheswim.com/hard-pool-water-removing-calcium-scale/comment-page-1/#comment-5915 Fri, 23 Feb 2018 18:31:28 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=16678#comment-5915 Hi, I have a medium sized indoorpool. The water has turned milky in colour and the calcium is high. Is there a way to remove it from the water?

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Comment on Ice Damage to an Aboveground Pool by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/ice-damage-to-an-aboveground-pool/comment-page-1/#comment-5914 Fri, 23 Feb 2018 15:09:19 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=8957#comment-5914 Hi James, the area around the skimmer always seems to take a beating more than other parts of the wall, because an ice sheet can flow inside of the skimmer, and because of the cut-out for the skimmer and the weight of the skimmer, it’s just more ‘flexible’ in that spot I guess. As to your question, if the torn area does not affect wall structural support, then it can be fixed. As you describe, carefully hammer the wall sections back in place, hammering against a large, heavy flat surface. Then you can patch holes with sheet metal, using liquid nails and duct tape, and pop rivets if available to you. Your steel patch material can actually be quite thick and tall, find online in sheets. You can cover in Wall Foam to mask the edge or bump0out of the panel. If needed for structural integrity, patch on both sides of the pool wall.

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Comment on Mid-Winter Pool Cover Disaster by Audra http://blog.intheswim.com/mid-winter-pool-cover-disaster/comment-page-1/#comment-5913 Fri, 23 Feb 2018 01:35:59 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=7697#comment-5913 Thank you so much for the help. I will do this!

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Comment on Ice Damage to an Aboveground Pool by James http://blog.intheswim.com/ice-damage-to-an-aboveground-pool/comment-page-1/#comment-5911 Thu, 22 Feb 2018 16:49:17 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=8957#comment-5911 I have an above ground pool in Ontario Canada, and recently my pool wall has crumpled in, creased, and torn, presumably due to ice damage (the liner is also torn and most of the water seems to have leaked out of the pool onto my lawn). The damage is in and around the skimmer area for the most part.

I’ve “released” my winter cover from the cords I had holding it to the pool so it’s not pulling on the the pool walls or outside posts so as to hopefully avoid any additional damage, since it seems like most of the water has now leaked out, and at this point I am probably looking at a new liner anyway.

Do you think it would be possible to repair this in the spring by hammering the bent and creased sections of the wall straight, and then patching the “torn” parts with pieces of sheet metal? It looks horrific, but the rest of the pool is great so I would really hate to have to replace my whole pool as a result of this one section. There does not appear to be any damage to the outside posts, top rail or tracks from what I can tell.

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Comment on Heavy Rains & Swimming Pools by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/heavy-rains-swimming-pools/comment-page-1/#comment-5910 Thu, 22 Feb 2018 15:48:22 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=14415#comment-5910 Hi Dana, as a minimum, a 5% slope may be normal, but 10% may give more room for error. I think a slope of 1″ per foot would be a good bet, or about a foot drop within the 10 ft distance to the swale.

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Comment on Mid-Winter Pool Cover Disaster by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/mid-winter-pool-cover-disaster/comment-page-1/#comment-5909 Thu, 22 Feb 2018 15:36:45 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=7697#comment-5909 Hi Audra, I call this a ‘sunken cover’ and it is quite common this year. When solid pool covers get large enough holes, pool water can come onto the cover, or be pumped out of the pool with a cover pump. It can be hard to deal with on large pools, and even small pools like yours. But here’s how this is usually tackled… Pull the cover off of the pool on one side, and have 2-3 people pull the cover to the other side, very slowly… pulling all of the cover water to one side, and trying to expose the hole. (You can add a garden hose at this time, to begin refilling the pool with fresh water). Inspect the cover closely as you pull, looking for a tear of 1″ to 6″ in size. Stop when you get to the hole, and place two 2×4’s across the pool, to keep the hole elevated above water level. If you do not find the hole, pull the cover back over the pool and repeat from the other side, until you find it (there may be more than one). Once the cover and all of the cover water are at one side, start pumping out the cover with your cover pump, or rent/borrow a larger submersible pump to do it faster. As pumping proceeds, continue to pull the cover into smaller areas, to concentrate the water, pulling out the slack and tightening the cover up every 50 gallons or so, until you and a helper can manage to hoist the cover and remaining water/sludge out of the pool, over the wall or top rail. That is how it is done, to avoid dumping the sludge into the pool, which is best. However, if that happens (and some sludge will be in the pool already) of if you just have to dump the cover (into the pool), it’s not the end of the world, but it does require some work. Use Leaf Rake style skim nets to scoop the gunk off the floor and surface as the pool refills and dilutes with fresh water. Unless it’s the dead of winter, I would continue to fill until full and start filtering the water, balancing the chemistry and shocking, followed by brushing and skimming and then vacuuming to waste, possibly twice. If the debris is not too bad, you could clean as much as possible, lower pH to 7.2 and shock the pool with chlorine, using 2-3 lbs per 10,000 gals. Then you could cover it again with a new pool cover, or just keep it clean and chlorinated until opening time, starting up the filter 2-4 weeks earlier than normal.

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Comment on Heavy Rains & Swimming Pools by dana s http://blog.intheswim.com/heavy-rains-swimming-pools/comment-page-1/#comment-5908 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 23:32:07 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=14415#comment-5908 Hi Davy,
Going on the premise, that I don’t need a french drain, or want one, if I can re-grade correctly. What is considered a steep enough grade? I have enough room to work and the swale is 10+ feet away down a slope. SO, in 1 foot, how much slope to be considered steep enough please? I need to run this by a landscaper who can re-grade too. THe key is I don’t want to lose my newly formed border, and trying to keep water from going under the patio, with this new border sir. Right now, after 23 years, I lost my original compacted dirt border, I put mulch on for years and the patio now is as high as the grass edging 1-2 feet away. Over time, I think the border was eroded and the grass got higher. St. Augustine I believe can do that.

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Comment on Mid-Winter Pool Cover Disaster by Audra http://blog.intheswim.com/mid-winter-pool-cover-disaster/comment-page-1/#comment-5906 Wed, 21 Feb 2018 15:40:35 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=7697#comment-5906 I have a new 15ft above ground swimming pool with a thick winterized pool cover filled with aleast 1ft of water or more on it. The pillow is pushed up against the side. Ive already taken tons of water off of it and believe its the pool water Ive been taking out all this time because half the water or more looks gone and the covers still filled. The water has pulled down the cover to where the cable is up under the plastic edges of the pool. The weather reports another 5dys of on and off rain and I just dont know what to do. Im afraid the pool covers gonna pull off the plastic edges or even worse that my pools gonna collapse. I thought maybe if I let the cable loose and let the cover fall in the pool that might save the structure, but then all that rain water will be in the pool. Pls Help I just dont know what to do.

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Comment on 11 Ways to Destroy Your Pool Pump by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/11-ways-to-destroy-your-pool-pump/comment-page-1/#comment-5903 Tue, 20 Feb 2018 14:22:50 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=20624#comment-5903 Hi, check page 23-24 of the owners manual to check the display comm power and drive comm power. Could be knicks on those tiny wires, or loose connection, dirt/insects, or something that is blocking power. May not need any parts. If your display is blank there are many steps in this Hayward Ecostar Troubleshooting Guide

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Comment on Swimming Pool Water Balance Problems by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/swimming-pool-water-balance-problems/comment-page-1/#comment-5902 Tue, 20 Feb 2018 13:36:37 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=9981#comment-5902 Hi there, ouch! OK… any possible way to drain and refill with better water? 🙂 If possible even to replace 1/4 of the water, that would be a good start, but if not I understand, and I would start on Alkalinity, adding Alkalinity Increaser (bicarb) to the pool, at a rate of 19 oz, (1 lb 3 oz) per 10,0000 gallons, to raise 10 ppm. You will need a Lot! And also need a reliable test kit with Titration TA test, like the K2005 test kit. Add the Bicarb in 3 or 4 smaller doses, not all at once, to avoid sending the pH level thru the roof, which could cause more cloudiness and scaling. Brush the deep end for a few minutes, then turn on the pump again. Adding so much bicarb will raise your pH, so after a few hours of circulation, re-test Alk and pH, lower pH if above 7.8, using pH Decreaser (acid) and then add more bicarb, until you get 80ppm TA and a pH of 7.2-7.6. It can take a few days sometimes, try to remain patient!

By this time, the chlorine level should have dropped to within normal range. Add a bit of cyanuric acid, 2 lbs per 10000 gals, to establish a base of 20 ppm, important to protect chlorine from the sun during the day time. The hardness is very high at 1000, which can cause bouts of cloudy water, scaling stains on surfaces, and other water management problems. Dilution is the Solution, again if possible to add softer water, replacing some of the water. Also avoiding cal hypo pool shock, which contains calcium. But most importantly, using a good sequestering agent, every 2 weeks like clockwork, to keep scale minerals locked in solution, where they can’t come out to play.

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Comment on Ice Damage to an Aboveground Pool by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/ice-damage-to-an-aboveground-pool/comment-page-1/#comment-5901 Tue, 20 Feb 2018 13:14:19 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=8957#comment-5901 Hi Lydia, probably better to just remove the cover at this point. Usually the cover will break before the pool will, but you are correct to think that when the cover is not supported by a high-enough water level, it pulls on and stresses the pool uprights. And even if nothing breaks, it could cause some damage. So remove the cover and find the leak. If it looks patchable, then on a 50+F degree day, patch the leak and fill the pool again and then re-cover the pool (don’t forget to us an Air Pillow). Or, keep the cover off and don’t add water, just add a little chlorine shock and brush and skim the pool each week as needed to keep the water clean and clear. If the liner needs to be replaced, or that’s the plan, you don’t have to worry about keeping it clean and chlorinated

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Comment on Ice Damage to an Aboveground Pool by Lydia http://blog.intheswim.com/ice-damage-to-an-aboveground-pool/comment-page-1/#comment-5900 Tue, 20 Feb 2018 05:15:32 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=8957#comment-5900 Ontario, Canada. It is an above ground, the liner ripped about a month ago and the cover which is new this winter has sunken deeper into the pool because the water lost. It looks like it is stretching from the weight of the snow. Should we remove the cover? It was “specially” made for Canadian winters and it is VERY securely attached to the outside posts. I am nervous the posts & sides will break under the weight of the snow. What do I do?

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Comment on Swimming Pool Water Balance Problems by Donnie Nguyen http://blog.intheswim.com/swimming-pool-water-balance-problems/comment-page-1/#comment-5899 Tue, 20 Feb 2018 02:21:45 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=9981#comment-5899 Hi Davy. Need help please
Total hardness : very high (1000)
Total chlorine : very high (10)
Free chlorine : very high (10)
pH : very low (6.2)
Total alkalinity : very low (0)
Stabilizer : low (0)

Pool is running high the last 3-4 days after treating for about 12-16 hours a day. Pool is cloudy but blue. Could kind of see near the bottom though. Did use some pool clarifier and phos-free. Any help would be appreciated.

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Comment on 11 Ways to Destroy Your Pool Pump by Clint http://blog.intheswim.com/11-ways-to-destroy-your-pool-pump/comment-page-1/#comment-5898 Mon, 19 Feb 2018 18:07:12 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=20624#comment-5898 I really appreciate your blog. I have a heyward pool pump (model sp3400vsp) for an inground pool reading “communication fail” check wiring between display and drive” I checked the everything is secure. I checked the timer and freeze guard, every thing working properly. Is there a part for the pump that needs replacing? If so can I order?

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Comment on Heavy Rains & Swimming Pools by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/heavy-rains-swimming-pools/comment-page-1/#comment-5894 Sun, 18 Feb 2018 21:31:23 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=14415#comment-5894 Hi Dana, I’m agreed on your points, and I can’t see a reason to use french drains if you have a steep enough grade, enough room to work and a short distance to meet swale or drain. However, if you have a small grade, and you dig a sloped (pitched) trench, perhaps dropping 1″ for every foot, and you fill with 3-4 inches of gravel, the method should work for most moderate storms. Over time the spaces between gravel will get filled up, and it eventually will stop working so well, however. Then the puddles start to form as it fills with water and oozes onto the deck (yuck). If you used grass or flat stone, or bricks, or even large river stones you would get faster dispersal of water than with gravel, which soaks up the water and reduces flow.

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Comment on Heavy Rains & Swimming Pools by dana s http://blog.intheswim.com/heavy-rains-swimming-pools/comment-page-1/#comment-5893 Sun, 18 Feb 2018 19:57:03 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=14415#comment-5893 I had one landscaper out, and he refused to just reslope the ground, unless he could put in a french drain. But, if there is room to slope toward a swale from that right hand side of screen enclosure, why not just slope it away again, and why would I need this drain? I realize if you have no where to slope to, then a french drain is your only option. But, in my case, on all 3 sides, I can slope downward and away. I feel like a new river rock border on the newly compacted and sloped dirt, will do better perhaps to keep the water moving away too, then, just the mulch. I know swimming pool screen enclosures don’t have gutters on them. So, only resloping and/or french drain, but, again, if there is somewhere to slope it to, why not do that and not put in a french Drain? Now, it is true that the sloped dirt border is more horizonal then vertical, but, if it goes away, slopes away, that is the key right, not how steep the slope is? Right now there are flat areas on that side of screen enclosure, so water remains there till it stops raining and then goes away fairly fast, once the rain is done. I just don’t like the water laking up there while it is torrential rains, when I could divert it by resloping through a landscaper.

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Comment on Freeze Protection for Pool Equipment by 11 Ways to Destroy Your Pool Pump | InTheSwim Pool Blog http://blog.intheswim.com/freeze-protection-for-pool-equipment/comment-page-1/#comment-5890 Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:55:38 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=7784#comment-5890 […] the pump, remove both pump drain plugs (and filter plugs, heater plugs, chlorinator, etc.). With freeze protection for pool equipment, a pool controller or a digital timeclock can use a freeze sensor, which will turn on the pump […]

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Comment on Hayward Pool Pump Troubleshooting by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/hayward-pool-pump-troubleshooting/comment-page-5/#comment-5889 Sat, 17 Feb 2018 17:10:19 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=13771#comment-5889 Hi Mike, it’s hard to say – not knowing which control system you use. If you find out, I would check the owner’s manual for information related to your symptoms.

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Comment on Hayward Pool Pump Troubleshooting by Mike http://blog.intheswim.com/hayward-pool-pump-troubleshooting/comment-page-5/#comment-5888 Sat, 17 Feb 2018 16:04:32 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=13771#comment-5888 We don’t have mechanical time clocks…it is all digital. We just verified all our time settings. We live in Arizona, so the automatic freeze setting isn’t an issue. We also a sense and dispense for pool chemistry that sometimes has a “ph feeder timeout” error code….could this have something to do with the pool pump running off the scheduled time? Thanks for your insight.

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Comment on Heavy Rains & Swimming Pools by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/heavy-rains-swimming-pools/comment-page-1/#comment-5887 Fri, 16 Feb 2018 23:12:08 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=14415#comment-5887 Hi Dana, the most important thing is the slope, you can top it with anything – rock, mulch, grasses. I’m sure the landscaper would slope it for you, to prevent standing water in heavy rains, it should be drained towards the swale, yes. Landscape fabric can be placed under the rock, on top of compacted or tamped soils, and covered in decorative rocks and stones. that will prevent most water from draining under the pool.

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Comment on Swimming Pool Re-Painting Tips by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/swimming-pool-re-painting-tips/comment-page-1/#comment-5886 Fri, 16 Feb 2018 23:01:13 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=14196#comment-5886 Hi Kimberly, – Advance Plus Conversion Paint is used to paint over rubber paints, as a primer, and then paint over the primer with epoxy. And it’s of course compatible with epoxy. However in your case, you will still have a layer of Epoxy paint between the Advance paint and the old rubber paint (assuming it is rubber, if you believe that is the problem with your surface), so it could still come up in those areas. I think it only works when you apply it directly to the rubber paint. If you want to be sure, the manufacturer will verify, call 800-458-2842 and ask for Technical Support. Refer to ‘Conversion Coating’, they won’t know our brand Advance Plus necessarily. Sorry for the late response to the question!

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Comment on Hayward Pool Pump Troubleshooting by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/hayward-pool-pump-troubleshooting/comment-page-5/#comment-5885 Fri, 16 Feb 2018 22:43:54 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=13771#comment-5885 Hi Paul, Ants can be a problem, when they get around motors or circuit boards, but it sounds like a pump motor problem, and could simply be a weak capacitor, in the rear of the motor (black cylinder). Spray some ant killer around, and replace the capacitor, but first, check all connections, maybe check incoming power (to the motor) if you have a test meter. Check all wires and switches and connections in the back of the motor, look for anything loose or ant infested or broken connections. Check wires on the other end, where they connect to the autochlor too. Since you didn’t say it trips a breaker, it’s probably not a short or ground-out of power, although it still could be, typically a wire touching metal other than the terminals on both end of the wire. And you can’t rule out a problem with the circuit board either. The best way to attack this is with the mantra “the problem lies where the power dies”. With a test meter, you check power at the motor, and it should be within 10% of 120V or 240V, whichever the motor is wired for, and if not, the power is traced back to a point where it full power is found, on the meter. Power going in, but power not coming out – and therein lies the problem, which could just be a loose wire, broken wire or faulty resistor/capacitor/relay…

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Comment on Ice Damage to an Aboveground Pool by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/ice-damage-to-an-aboveground-pool/comment-page-1/#comment-5884 Fri, 16 Feb 2018 22:36:26 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=8957#comment-5884 Hi Rob, what may have happened, (just guessing without looking at it), is the ground may have had ‘Frost Heave’, when saturated soils expand and lift heavy objects like concrete slabs, and even small pools. When the ground resettled, the pool stayed in a raised position. I’m surprised that the water weight did not force it back down on its own… maybe when you fill the pool up in spring it will resettle, might need to have a few heavy people to lean on the top rails at the same time, lol. If the supports (aka uprights) are crumpled or bent that could be the problem, or why it’s not settled, and I imagine the bottom rail is bent or crimped at two points, on both sides, where the raising ends. Or another route is to drain the pool, dissasemble, to bend straight the bent metal again, or replace (lots of work). Or just throw sand under the raised side, lol, I’m kidding. Good Luck!

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Comment on Salt Water Pool Chemistry by Davy Merino http://blog.intheswim.com/salt-water-pool-chemistry/comment-page-1/#comment-5883 Fri, 16 Feb 2018 22:11:33 +0000 http://blog.intheswim.com/?p=15871#comment-5883 Hi Pamela, it’s an upsell yes, but it is a necessary chemical to use with salt systems, and all salt system manufacturers recommend using conditioner (aka stabilizer, aka cyanuric acid), to protect chlorine from the sun, which depletes the chlorine rapidly and causes the salt cell to overwork during the sunny part of the day. If your pool is very heavily shaded, or indoors, you may not need to use it, but if you get several hours per day of sun directly on the pool, having a low level of cyanuric acid (20-40 ppm) is a good idea, for salt cell longevity. The harder the salt cell works, the shorter it will last, in most cases.

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